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environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with the heavy capability and saying don't worry, we're here to help you and take over, we're here to complement and support you with the appropriate ways that you request our needs. the next few slides that i'm going to go over here shows some of the military capability and how some of those responses that we did during this exercise can also be applied at home in a domestic environment such as a response to maybe an earthquake here in san francisco. so the first part up there, you see
in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in
an incredibly difficult political environment and a really challenging fiscal environment as well and that's put a ton of pressure on adhering to the pledge. >> stephen: isn't grover norquist going to bring down the hammer on these guys come midterms? >> it's very hard to say because in some places-- for example south carolina and georgia-- that's very possible. but you have to understand --. >> stephen: real america. >> exactly. but, you have to understand -- hey, i'm from brooklyn, my friend. that's real america, too. (cheers and applause) >> stephen: no, excuse me, calm down, that's "real" america. it's ironic patriotism. >> america has changed a n a lot of ways over 20 years. one of the big changes is that we have a lot more people over the age of 65. and republicans, like democrats, like programs like medicare and social security so when you have a lot more old people, those programs get more expensive and that means that it's hard to keep tax levels exactly where they have been during the bush years. >> stephen: that's fine. but why is this happening publicly. why are people like lindsey g
that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looking at why this building came to be, in many ways it also included mayor
. the environment is huge. it is stronger than willpower. surrounding yourself with artists, being in a culture where artists are driving, and where a huge amount of them is a healthy environment. >> you are making it safer. push, push. that is better. when i start thinking, i see it actually -- sometimes, i do not see it, but when i do, it is usually from the inside out. it is like watching something being spawned. you go in, and you begin to work, excavate, play with the dancers, and then things began to emerge. you may have a plan that this is what i want to create. here are the ideas i want to play with, but then, you go into the room, and there maybe some fertile ideas that are becoming manifest that are more interesting than the idea you had initially set out to plan. so there has to be this openness for spontaneity. also, a sense that regardless of the deadline, that you have tons of time so the you can keep your creativity alive and not cut it off and just go into old habits. it is a lot like listening. really listening to watch what is going to emerge. i like this thing where you put y
a lot of work on measuring levels of chemicals in people and environments, so one study she did was with also in richmond california to looking at the different levels of chemicals, diesel exhaust in richmond which you would expect to be very different, and she's going to help us see if we can build a study, so this was a great thing that you brought to our attention. >> i start to think about it over the years but especially working in an airport and now in an actively working diesel pump station. >> and it's not something you have any control over, and that's the same kind of fragmentation we're seeing at all levels, it's hard to make changes when jurisdictions move. >> but if i could get her contact information or something after the presentation, that would be great. >> okay, cool. >> i had two questions, one is you were just saying to use glass when you're cooking or microwave, what about -- i was told before that you could use plastic for the refrigerator or storage, are you saying avoid plastics all together for food storage, and then the second question is water bottles
, people's experiences in working in international environments to help promote humanitarian missions. fleet week got involved with a humanitarian mission back in october in the earthquake in van, turkey. there's a heavy kurdish in san francisco and the ... better recover from their event and how to better prepare in the future from the katz traufk event that had taken place would not occur. we got a phone call at the fleet week association to ask if we could help bring together some resources and leet a fact-finding mission and we did that. one of our panelists is up here, second from your left, rob dudgeon, he's with the department of emergency management and he's the director of emergency services. rob's organization has been instrumental in creating the program that we have from back in 2010 all the way through to today and i know in the future we're already talking about putting together a hot wash of everything we've learned through 2012's fleet week. so rob is going to talk about the van, turkey mission. from turkey we have rear admiral guereva he has more than 14 years se
was the feedback we heard from different people about some of the changes to the san francisco environment specifically like the jfk cycle track of the golden gate park. different advocacy groups talking together. we were able to have a discussion about what is the intelligent design to bring these new features into our city. our workshop was - we had a keynote speaker, dr. lisa iasoni (sounds like), a woman with disability. a professor at harvard. a researcher in health studies. written a book called more than rems. in her book she make the argument that an accessible built environment is one where people can bike, hike, roll, and when you are out engage the community you get the benefit of not only of better health but better mental health and better connection. she was an inspiring speaker. we also had a series of panelists including jesse lorenz (sounds like), laisha home (sounds like), elizabeth stamp from walk sf, our own christina -- from the board of directors, over 40 people attended the afternoon session in over 30 that attended the evening session. the discussions were
're particularly involved in environmental factors this is something that involves the city environment. and it's something that dirties the environment and we're involved in keeping a clean area in the school and city. while our impact isn't great we do give people an outlet to help their community rather than hurt it and we do teach them what kind of real impact it does have, both monetarily and to people and their quality of life. >> thank you. at this time i will open public comment on item no. 36789 seeing none, public comment is now closed. [ gavel ] made chair? >> yes i'm just looking right now the applicant is under 18 years old and in the charter all members of boards and commissions must be of legal voting age unless the authorizing legislation sets a position for someone under 18. so i'm checking that right now before you take a vote on it. >> okay. then if we may, if we could -- i will take comments first, but maybe we can continue this item to a later portion of the meeting. i would want to find a way to support this applicant, because i know we have a lot of young people engage
came all the way from israel to meet the people and hang out and she was amazing. >> the environment, the people, everything. it is like everyone has so much energy. >> hey, you are beautiful. and i love you. >> why? because... it is definitely a lot more fun than being inside. >> so far we have had zero problems. it is a long-step process, a lot of thinking and people involved. so we think that we got rid of all of the problems that could happen. they are doing it, and we are doing it and everybody is doing the best that they can. >> it is a wonderful out reach >> come. >> it is beautiful. ♪ >> hello, i am with the san francisco parks department serious we are featuring some wonderful locations in your and very own backyard. this is your chance to find your heart in san francisco with someone special. we are here at the lovely and historic palace of fine arts, located in the bustling marina district. originally built for the 1950's exposition, the palace is situated along san francisco's waterfront. it is ada accessible and is reached by the 28, 30, and 91 bus lines. with its rotu
down the exterior of the building. so imaging that this will be a very calm environment when it comes to controlling wind. and it also allows us to address the whole issue of how to avoid birds flying into the structure. that extra depth and and keeping the birds from hitting the building. if you look across first street you see one of the key retail lobbies of the center at the street level. and you see the entrance to parking and you see the relationship between the north edge of the transit center and the south edge of the tower. now, you are standing across mission street. at the corner of mission and freemont. once again you see the heavier metallic work at the base of the tower and you see the grove of redwoods and the sculpture at the corner and you see how lively and prominent that is going to be and i think that it is welcoming public presence in the streets of san francisco. and you are now looking directly across mission street, the tower is on your right and the grove of redwoods are inviting you to enter the center and immediately on access in front of you are the two mai
are probably saying is, you know, maybe we should consider very severe environments in case of a disaster which personally i think that's how we train and probably most of your environments. maybe you want to start from a place of more limitations rather than less and one of them is not doing that kind of coordination via cell phone. again, i think this was, last year there was a table top, this is the first time we're actually doing a drill. there's reason for growth and as bijon said, maybe next year we are meshing xhapld and control so command and control is done over the exercise com link and keeping it separate. i think the point is well taken that the recommendation i made, i think we can introduce more rigor into the execution of the com drills next year. >> any other questions? panelists, thank you very much, i appreciate it. let's give them a big round of applause. (applause). >> something that took place yesterday was our medical exchange. rob is going to give you a summary of how that went and at the same time we're going to bring up some additional panelists who will give us their
, they get it during an exercise environment, but how is that going to differ from reality? but it's permeating down to the local level now. and the next challenge is how do we cross that bridge to truly having community resiliency? how do we leverage faith-based and nongovernmental organizations to carry that message for local, state, and federal leaders? so, i think that's the next challenge going forward. but the messages being delivered from the top down, i think the next piece is how do you now move it horizontally across the community level. >> and in closing, i'm going to go down the panel and ask if there's any closing comments or points that you haven't had the opportunity to make. i think, you know, people are anxious to hear your thoughts on this particular program and on this mission because it is going to take all of us if the big one happens. so, if i can start with you, vice admiral beaman, if there is anything you'd like to impart, sir. >> actually, i have 37 things i'd like to talk about, but knowing we are the last thing between you and the refreshments in the bac
combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the north facade. two different levels of photo volume takes. >> we have over 600 solar panels and three platforms on the building, and four integrated wind turbines. the wind turbines and the solar panels produce 7% of the building's energy. and we're reducing the use of energy here by 32% in the office building. >> the entire building is controlled by a complex computer system which monitors and adjusts air, heating and lights as well as indoor
. >> the average woman is not as strong as the average man. and we -- it's a very physical physical environment. >> reporter: retired marines general myatt says infantry are physically overwhelming for men. >> you would have to ask yourself, is this the situation that we would like to say we're going to put our daughters in just so that they have an opportunity to advance in a career? >> reporter: active first lieutenant coleen ferril -- farrell is part of the suit despite disapproval from her commanders. >> there was some opposition but they knew this was something i was very passionate about. >> reporter: david steveson, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> more details now on women in combat. pentagon statistics show that more than 144 women troops have been killed in the wars in iraq and afghanistan and more than 860 women have been injured. of the 205,000 u.s. troops currently serving in afghanistan about 20,000 of them are women. >>> it's a world many of us don't know. a surprising report on domestic workers and what they're put through by their employers. >>> help wanted why president obama is aski
. as more do, it will create an environment for us to reach an agreement. we need the same willingness to step 4 on the left to be able to meet in this room at the table or wherever the room maybe and to come to an agreement that will lead us forward. one thing i am hoping for is if we can reach an agreement, in principle before the end of the year, then implement it, i believe this is what many have been waiting for to launch a more spirited recovery. if we get this done, if we have a credible $4 trillion deficit reduction plan signed and sealed, signed by the president, what does that say to the rest of the world? many economies in europe and other places are struggling, but ours will be the strongest in the world in terms of the future. it takes a lot of hard work but it is worth the effort. all will prosper. saturday night, my wife and i went to see a movie by spielberg. about another gentleman who lived in illinois for a while named abraham lincoln. toward the end of the movie, daniel day-lewis was sitting across from confederates and there was talk about what the war was all abou
detrimental thing to the environment that could ever occur but i think what they're missing is, canadian oil sands only produce .1of 1% of. we have to get the facts out there and i think most folks understand that this oil is important to energy security. it is important to job creation. it is important to economic stimulus. and, if it is denied, we don't have any, net benefit to the environment. we only have a net detriment to the economy and to energy security. that is why the polling is in our favor. melissa: not only that, if they're talking what will happen to the environment if the pipeline doesn't go through, it dsn't mean that you're not going to take oil from those oil sands in canada. it just means that oil is not going to come to the u.s., right? you're not not going to develop that resource, it will just end up going to asia if we don't build the pipeline, right? >> i think as the chie economiss of the international energy agency today said, the world demand is growing and we need every drop of canadian oil. so canadian oil sands is going to get developed. it will get developed r
oil. that's where i want to get. i spent several years as chairman of the environment and public works committee and several years as the ranking member. all during that time people keep saying the one thing we all agree on is we need to be off of foreign oil. we need not to be dependent upon the middle east. and yet right now we know and no one is going to refute this fact, no one today, or in the future, that when we had the usgs report and the other reports saying that we now are in a different position than we've been before. we are not only -- we do not have only 2% as some people are saying, of the reserves in fossil fuels. i'm talking about coal, oil and gas. we are number one in the world now. we didn't used to be. two years ago we couldn't have said that. right now we are. we have the -- the opportunity and we can look at the opportunity in terms of our -- of our reserves that are usable of being totally self-sufficient. this is the thing so disturbing when people talk about they don't want to be dependent on the middle east therefore we have to spend billions of dollars of de
there are people like tyson for years. we need to make sure that protection of the environment is part of government. so i like the fact that there is balance there. but let's not lose sight of the fact that this is a big success story. we don't need to have a regulates economy. we need to give the private sector enough breathing room and make sure that we don't brush this initiative. i'm optimistic for the first time in a long time. >> what did you say? free market unregulated economy? >> that is my fantasy. i can't believe it. that we are in agreement on protecting the environment. if the people don't want it, they won't do it. anyway, tyson, thank you. dan mitchell, thank you. now let's talk about california with crashing production and a 13% top state income tax rate. no kidding. no surprise. companies are fleeing the state. but where will they end up? we are about to show you. those little things still get you. for you, life's about her. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's ri
calvillo: item 26 is a resolution authorizing the department of environment to retroactively accept and expend a grant in the amount 400,000 from the u.s. department of environment, environmental protection to support brown fields assessment projects. >> president chiu: same house same call? this resolution is adopted. item 27. >> clerk calvillo: item 27 resolution authorizing the department of emergency management to retroactively accept and expend a fiscal year 2012 program grant in the amount of 29 million from the us department of homeland security through the california emergency management agency for the periods of october 12, 2012 through may 31, 2014. >> president chiu: same house same call, the resolution is adopted. >> clerk calvillo: item 28 a mast lease extension for the department of ha public health n mission street for approximately 32.36 million per month with annual increases. >> president chiu: same house same call, this resolution is adopted. next item. >> clerk calvillo: item 29 is a resolution authorizing the department of public health to retroactively accept a
to the environment and community would be to use the degaussing station as a clubhouse for the kids so they have shelter, restroom facilities, and a place to store their equipment. if rec and park doesn't want to pay for it, even though they just received about $200 million, i would be willing to fund it myself as a contribution to the city. i'm looking for six votes here. who want to put the environment and the welfare of the children ahead of the dollars of a restaurant lease. do the right thing. and vote against this restaurant lease on december 4. and with all due respect, supervisor farrell, i ask you again, with the association, with the hospitality industry, and$á( mz your own father pitchg this restaurant, do the decent and honorable thing and recuse yourself from this vote. thank you. >> president chiu: i want to remind the public there's a rule in the board chamber that we not address individual members in your public comment. if you could address all your comments to the full board. thank you. >> hi. i'm nichole preato i'm a resident on marina boulevard. thank you. hi. i recently fou
stable. and we went straight to helman and nimruz province. very complex dynamic environment that we were operating in but before i begin it talk to you about the operational picture, i just want to give you a snapshot of afghanistan. when we got there i want to set the frame here so you understand what we're dealing with. afghanistan ranged 180th out of 1 86 on the world bank list of developed countries. 20 percent of the babies won't reach their first year of life. there is a 44 year life span for your average citizen. it has a less than 20 percent literacy rate and girls in afghanistan will marry by the time they are 15 and will likely birth their second child by the time they are 20. so this is the long-term effects of violence and civil wars within a failed state by every measure. the marines who are currently still in southwest afghanistan, they are surrounded by very conservative culture. in 2010, this is not true now but narco trafficking and helman province alone was the fourth largest trafficker of heroin in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the
of the side of the house go to those victims, and our thanks go to the emergency services and the environment agency for the fantastic job that they do. let me also associate myself with his remark about the leveson report which we published tomorrow. i hope we can work on an all party bases. this is a once in a generation opportunity for real change. and i hope that this house can make it happen. mr. speaker, when the work program was launched in june 2011, the prime minister described it as, and i quote, the biggest and boldest program since the great depression. 18 months on, can the update the house on how it is going? >> yes icann. i can update out to over 800,000 people have taken part in the work program. over half came off benefits. over 200,000 people have gotten into work because of the work program. but i think it is worth remembering that the work program is dealing with the hardest to work cases there are in our country. these are people, adults have been out of work for over a year, and young people have been out of work for over nine months. on that basis yes, we need to make f
department of environment a grant of 400,000 from united states department of environmental protection for preparing cleanup plans for potentially contaminated areas in southeast san francisco in support of the bluegreenway project for period of october 1st, 2012 through october 31, 2015. >> supervisor chu, supervisor avalos, mr. rodriguez, department of environment. we are here seeking your support of the resolution. it is a grant the department received from the epa to continue our brownfield project effort in the bay view and hunter's point community. this will allow us to go out and inventory brownfield sites, do site assessment, preliminary work and identify properties for potentially linking the blue greenway project to it. this is in partnership with port of san francisco, parks alliance in order to open up greater access to the southeastern waterfront . in addition this was announced with the epa as a companion effort. the epa awarded 400,000 in workforce training to hunter's park family and workforce for collaborating with hunter's point family so their folks have an opportuni
, antidote for this low growth economic environment. it uses proprietary technology, collect data from other measurement technologies and it processes that data that's designed to tell the customers what's needed to improve efficiency of workers out in the field. especially at construction sites and new infrastructure builds. those software builds can cut fuel costs or improve customers service or safety standards. it all comes down to helping other companies to find new ways to squeeze more money out businesses. that's the kind of pitch that never goes out of style. certainly not one that the old trimble could have offered. it's a joint venture with cat pilller where their technology will be sold to cat dealerships for everything to machine control technologies. this gives the company a tremendous outsource international sales force. it looks like it's become the real deal. companies had a conference for the users of the systems. this wasn't a gigantic who la gigantic shindigs, they set a record for attendance. we're not just counting bodies. the reason so many people showed up is because t
when it does. imagine classroom in a blended learning environment where rich digital content comes from the very best providers where teachers are managing the learning experience for students. where it's competency based. we don't sit our butt in the seat for 180 days and say it's time to take three months off and come back and sit our slighter bigger butts down for another 180 days. we move to a system where if you master the material you are not held back. if you haven't mastered the terrible you're not bushed along. the accountability to customize the learning experience in a powerful way is what technology offers. that requires changes of law. many states are embracing element of what is the digital learning revolution. in doing so, i think they will accelerate learning in ways that will create the gaps. we will see them begin to narrow and it will create real opportunity for continuous improvement and advancement. the final thing i'm going tell you talk to you about is about another book. that's the book being a texan by birth and floridian by choice. i have a little texas her tib
and is trying to adapt. >> i think he is an and french environment, surrounded by journalists. they are asking questions in english. he is trying to fit in. i think it is natural. some people will do it, some people will not. >> it has happened before. here is his manager doing patch. >> i knew when i came here, i thought maybe one of them would drop, and it is arsenal. >> meanwhile, which is between languages, never mind that sense, what does he think about the french? >> i have not heard it. i am not optimistic about his performance. it is a little bit boring. >> there are always questions. so we wait to hear if he will answer like this. only once. >> a doping has given the sports world a bad name recently and now the man leading the charge against drugs says that a lack of testing is sending a man -- dreadful message. the president of the anti- dumping agency accused football and other sports of failure of leadership. >> lance armstrong is now the top symbol of a failure to tackle drugs. the fallout is posing questions for all sports in the fight against doping. armstrong showed the gruesom
want to know why. >> environment. environmental impact? >> reporter: not san francisco. but eastern marin where there's already active research on breast cancer clusters. >> it's an opportunity to look at those areas, all the areas and see what is different and what's similar. >> barlo and fellow researchers says their study did not find a common cause. lifestyle, delay childbirth, bottle water, hormone replacement therapy have all been apropossed. >> if it's full t it's all over the by a area i think the important thing is to look at environmental causes. >> activists say this should trigger calls for ax. researchers -- action. researchers say it has to be something. >>> federal officials are expected to decide this week the fate of a family owned oyster farm. seeking a ten year extension of the current federal permit to harvest oysters. some environmental list says says they're they're opposed to extension. he's expected to make a decision by friday. >>> now to capital hill why un ambassador susan rice met with senators regarding her comments about the deadly september 11th attack
profits out of this rescue package if the politics are able to stabilize the political environment. this also helps the financial community. >> and a quick look at the market numbers now -- the dax closed 0.5% up. euro stoxx 50 closing just slightly up. across the atlantic, the dow jones is currently going down, and the euro is trading at $ 1.2933. the world's biggest economy is bracing itself for an economic nightmare. unless u.s. lawmakers reach a budget deal in january 1, a raft of temporary tax cuts are due to expire, and spending cuts will take effect. >> that means the u.s. is charging full speed at the fiscal cliff. the dramatic fiscal tightening triggered by this press this could tip the u.s. and possibly the whole global economy into recession. here is more. >> precision craftsmanship, made in the usa the marlon still company in baltimore produces wire baskets for the automobile, defense, and medical industries. it is one of the fastest-growing companies in the u.s. the company president wants to keep it that way, but at the moment, he is holding off on further investments
. officials at the environment ministry hav a asked to have storage sites built on their land. government authorities are concerned about the safety of such facilities. they said the central government must be made aware na accepting the proposal does not mean they will allow the building of these facilities. >> we decided to accept the survey because there are various things that can't be known until it is carried out. >> a resident evacuated from one of the towns expressed her feeling about the surveys being accepted. >> translator: i think we will never be able to go back home in our lifetime. we really have no other choice. nowhere else accepts such a thing. >> japan's ancient capital kyoto draws a constant stream of admirers to its gardens, temples and treasures. the crowds are especially intense at this time when the city's trees explode in fall colors. nhk world's rina nakano has been enjoying the autumn hues at a temple with a twinkle. >> we are mixing it up by bringing an autumn nightscape. today we're at a zen buddhist temple northeast of kyoto station. the biggest attraction is
better for us. we thank the supervisors to put such an emphasis on improving the environment for us. thank you. >> thank you. i'm going to call up a couple more name cards. [ reading speakers' names ] >> good afternoon supervisors, thank you, my name is jorge potio, a lifetime resident of san francisco and i want to start by recognizing the hard work that has been put into the legislation. to those affects and to those who are supporting the people affected by this issue, really, it's serving as kind of a buffer to what could have been a real crisis. as a housing rights advocate for the mission collaborative for the past five years and a friend of many people who have had bed bugs i have wintered firsthand the devastating affects on lives. and so i can really appreciate this a[pro-rb/] and thank you to the working group that put this together. it puts in place procedures and policies that make it easier for housing advocates and tenant communitis to navigate this process, but we know we can put what we like on paper and promise to follow it to the best our abilitis and commit t
it comes to or shared values, marriage equality, environment. we are a becon to the rest of the world when it comes to our sports. i was proud a couple years ago to carry the legislation around america's cup bid to work with mayor lee to work with the warriors. i'm particularly pleased to work with supervisor ferrell and 49ers organization to make sure we win this bid. in my first couple weeks i put in a call to a young man named jed york. along with colleagues who were new in 2009 we asked you to consider sticking around in the city. while we may someday curse you for stop take our blessed team out of the city, we love the fact we are working together on this bid. we love that our 49er also continue to play great football down the street. we love the fact we still have hometown pride in the best football team in the franchise. thank you. looking forward to getting this done. [applause] >> i want to reiterate two points and open up to questions, if you have them for the folks up here. this will be the most shared super bowl super bowl bid ever. that is the key, hash tag super bowl and help
, transportation, the environment, and high-tech issues. >> he is also the greatest karaoke sing their -- singer and all of congress. -- in all of congress. [applause] >> he just told me i had five minutes. what do you think of this program? [applause] it is about time. i want to thank francis and fong. i think this is the very first statewide heritage month held with the mayor of san francisco. let me say something about heritage month in san francisco and your mayor. in the old days, you remember san francisco was known for passing all of these anti- chinese ordinances to limit the movement, the productivity of chinese in the city. we know two things. change happens. maybe the state of california is the state of golden opportunities, where we have a chinese-american mayor of san francisco. 35 years ago, congress members passed similar resolutions in both house and the senate to formally recognize the first 10 days of may as asian-pacific heritage week. one year later, president jimmy carter signed into law a joint resolution to officially designate the annual celebration. 11 years later, presi
to chain the rules any way. in an environment anything that passes the senate without republican votes is unlikely to pass the house. years to get to every political is to blame instead of having rules. the three times we followed the rules this year, we passed bills. the highway bill, the postal reform bill and the ag bill, all passed. amendments anyone wants to offer and do what the senate does every single time when we did that, we passed a piece of legislation in a bipartisan way. anywhere in the house. at least i would understand there was a governing argument if the majority leader had a said what we pass here is going just going to pass it with all over again. that is not the case, believe me, this is a hornet's nest that makes it harder to get the work done that has to be done and>> questions. >> what filibuster reform would>> what ought to be happening, ought to be sitting down not rules changes are appropriate. agreement, it would be done in a manner consistent with the rules, which would require 67 votes, which i don't wouldit is important to remember that the senate hadn't
. and in that environment, you have then the ejection of alpha, beta and gamma particles. so it's almost simple geometry. right now, this particle we'd call an alpha particle. this is a helium nucleus. and i'll write that helium nucleus like this. and i'll put a two down here and a four here. and this nomenclature, i hope you're familiar with. this is simply the atomic number. it tells you it's atomic number two in the periodic table of substances, yeah? it's got two positive charges. and the four refers to the atomic mass unit. and that's the number of nucleons altogether. i call this, by the way, nucleons. i can call you a people, a person, but a person can be a male or female. nucleon can be a proton or neutron. see what i'm saying? but there's four nucleons altogether, so it has a mass of four and atomic number two. so that would be the configuration. if i put another proton in there, then it would now be-- does anyone know? it would be the element lithium because now it would have three and up here would be five. and any nucleus that has three protons, by definition and by chemical properties, will
to statehood. it does nothing to get them closer to state hood. it may actually make the environment more difficult. >> israel is concerned that palestinians will be eligible to join the international criminal court. press charges of human rights violations. in the words of an israeli official, the daniel could be worse than rockets from gaza. the u.s. reportedly asked israel not to impose harsh sanctions against the palestinian authority. >> they can get pieces of paper from the-up. but they are not going move forward and not going to make the palestinian statehood more real. >> of now, more than two-third member countries recognize palestine. the vote in favor of, the nonmember statehood is expected to be overwhelming. supports include france, china and india. bret? >> bret: david lee miller, in jerusalem. thank you. >>> still ahead -- hillary clinton is on her way out. we look at her time at state. first, are clinton's former senate colleagues willing to use the nuclear option? if we want to improve our schools... ... what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated eq
load and environment for business. how many businesses are leaving the state because they're overtaxed or overburdened or overregulated, whatever it is. what is the net there. home values whether rising falling and unemployment. they're trying to make the overall point it is a death spiral for a state when you have more people in the cart than pulling the cart. is that -- >> absolutely. melissa: is that correct? >> that is absolutely it. that is probably the best indicator of all. a lot of credit ratings really lag reality. if you have a high income state. you then raise your taxes like maryland just did, very similar o california, so you really collecting a lot of taxes the bond ratings agencies say you're pretty good. what they don't realize they rent u-haul trucks in those states and eventually people leave. in the short term they don't leave but in the long term they don't come. and those that can leave will. melissa: you know, people will write in make the point when you're talking about pensioners like we were in the last segment, these people paid in at one time to call them ta
gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> breaking news tonight on the libya mess. a new allegation that the obama administration still cannot get its story straight after so much time, even as recently as this morning. ironicall
to extract the region's natural gas, while preserving its environment. i reported from there earlier this year. the banks of the white river in eastern utah are perfectly quiet, in a way it's sometimes hard to find in a world of seven billion people-- just the sounds of gently flowing water, a hint of a breeze, the occasional bird. the gorgeous vistas and rare solitude sit on public land thousands of feet above a bonanza trapped deep in the earth. from high above, it's easy to see how the gas industry has changed the landscape, with gas wells by the thousands altering the fragile desert ecosystem. utah environmentalists say the view from the air and from the canyon floor illustrate why they want these public lands protected. >> you know, what families find when they come here, what outfitters, what americans come to experience this place, it's the quiet, it's the solitude, it's that you don't have the sight and sounds of human development around you. it's a place where people can come and restore themselves. there are more cliffs on this side. and that's an area where there really ar
contribution to the local business environment and the local economy. last september, we learned that the regulations for entertainment permits for karaoke recently changed and we moved immediately to try to move festa into compliance with the current regulations, we filed the application right away, unfortunately i had to leave for europe almost immediately after, but we worked closely with the commission throughout and we completed i think all the necessary inspections and approvals from the city departments including the police department, the fire department, building including basic building and electrical, public health and the planning department. we also completed a fairly extendbacker extensive outreach program per the good neighbor policy, we talked with a large number of the surrounding businesses in the same building and masae's also made contact with people who are living in the immediate vicinity, and they gave very nice favorable comments on festa. i would like to say by the way, we very much appreciated the commission's help and guidance as we moved through this
market a little more friendly, and mak making the business environment more friendly. i think a large part of it, and a big part of it is abandoning the austerity. at least until they're able to return to economic growth and slowly start piecing it in. >> susie: let me ask you about this, wall street has been so focused on the fiscal cliff situation, how important are these issues in europe for american investors? >> i think the issues in europe are important because they've been a pain in most investors' sides for the past couple of years. if you think about the end game in europe, which probably includes some type of fiscal integration, we realize it is going to take a long time. i believe that what you are seeing in europe is creating some volatility in the markets over the next couple of years to come. however, the last action from the european central bank was a game changer. in coming in and opening up the o.n.t n.t. program bought the sovereigns a little more time to work through their issues. i think the market is going to weigh in on investors' minds over the years to come. >
environment as well as just the local ecology, he was a founder of a lot of those fields and we feel that he describes kind of our concept as well as just sort of what we're about there. >> okay. what i was saying is that i'm glad someone's taking on the purple onion, the purple onion was e clastic, it's an important venue, i'm glad you're improving it, i'm glad you are recreating it into something wonderful, i'm glad you're considering musical groups like the students and that you're going to continue doing comedy. sound like you have a lot of work in front of you. bringing it up to ada access is a lot of work. do you have any idea when you might open? >> i can optimistically tell you a date but i know i will not hit that date. i think, you know, we are going for june, but that can easily push to late summer, if not beyond, you know, our plans have all been finalized, we are in the permit process right now. we are waiting for the historic preservation society's green light, they have verbally okayed it, we're going to issue two separate permit, one for internal and one for exterior so we're
and giving the military a chance to work with the civilian authority in a non-crisis environment so that when they have to do it anywhere in the world, they've got one extra training day. that's the way we look at it, it's all one extra training day. you add all that up, we have a lot better chance when we need it. with that, i'm going to bring up dejon and take over the panel and i'll talk to you shortly. >> thank you, rob. the panelists we have represent a broad group of participants, some of them participated themselves and some of them had individuals in their organizations participate. and i want them to start with an introduction of who they are, a little bit about their own background, so you understand the lens they were looking through when they were providing some of their answers today. starting with our 3 panelists that were part of our command and control exercise then we'll hear from our 3 panelists that were in our communications drill. >> lieutenant commander mike kress, operations officer at naval beach group 1, i was a coach during the exercise. we supported the exercise
by side and see what kinds of things come up in that environment and how we can work out those gaps. >> yeah, i would agree. i think my take away would be that we should exercise together, small table tops initially and we can always develop larger ones, to really understand the capabilities and further plan and also how integration would work during a big disaster. >> so first i would tell my boss, major general steve, sir, this was a very successful demonstration of our medical surge cape pblt and it was well done. but now we need to evolve and keep moving this forward. what we did on this particular time was stand-alone demonstrations of our particular capabilities. i think the next thing we need to do is a joint demonstration. for example, our shock trauma has many similarities to a dmat that might be a next step in the evolution of this type event. it also, after discussing with several members of the hospitals during the tour yesterday, it's clear that there are many other civilian military training opportunities that exist. those can be maybe collaboration between medical
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